Topics of Interest

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

In 1972, as the Paris Peace Accords drew to a conclusion, young William Reeder, Jr. was a Captain in the U.S. Army, assigned to an AH-1G Cobra Attack Helicopter in Vietnam. For many U.S. servicemen and women, the Vietnam War was over. Reeder was afraid he missed the opportunity to see combat as a Cobra gunship pilot. The North Vietnamese had other plans, however, and the Easter Offensive changed Reeder’s life forever. On Wednesday, November 15, 2017, Dr. William S. Reeder will present a lecture at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, describing how fighting in the spring of 1972 led to his capture while defending the American base at Ben Het in Vietnam and how he survived the horrifying ordeal of being a POW in Vietnam.

Dr. William Reeder was the last U.S. Army prisoner captured in the Vietnam War, and his story is one of courage, hope, and survival. In 1971, Reeder was already an accomplished pilot, having flown secret missions deep into enemy territory on his first tour. He returned as a helicopter pilot flying a Cobra Attack Helicopter but believed the Americans had beaten the Viet Cong and were passing everything to the South Vietnamese Army. As the 1972 Easter Offensive raged several months into his second tour, he was providing support to forces at the besieged base of Ben Het, when his chopper went down in a flaming corkscrew. Reeder survived the crash and evaded the enemy for three days, before finally being captured and held in jungle cages for weeks. After which, he endured a grueling forced march on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, costing the lives of seven of the POWs in his small group of twenty-seven.

Dr. William Reeder is a training and leader development consultant living in the Pacific Northwest. He spends parts of each year teaching at the NATO SOF School at Chievres Air Base, Belgium. He is a retired colonel and a thirty-year Army veteran, with two tours of duty in Vietnam. He has in excess of three thousand hours of flight time, including more than one thousand hours in combat. He is the recipient of the Silver Star for gallantry, two Distinguished Flying Crosses for heroism, and three Bronze Star Medals. In 1977, he was named Army Aviator of the Year and was inducted into the U.S. Army Aviation Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2017, he was chosen as the Naval Institute’s “Author of the Year.”

DATE: Wednesday, November 15, 2017

TIME: Doors open at 6:30 PM and the talk begins at 7:15 PM

PLACE: USAHEC, Visitor and Education Center, Multipurpose Room

 

For updates and any last-minute changes in “Perspectives” meeting times and places, please check: www.USAHEC.org or call the Information Desk: (717) 245-3972.

Hits: 100
0

The United States Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, welcomes you and your family to feel the beat of the drums, enjoy the dancing, and take part in our annual celebration of Native American Heritage Month, with the Red Blanket Native Pride Dancers on Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 7:00PM. The dancers will perform a wide array of ceremonial and social dancing techniques passed down through their culture for generations. The demonstration will include authentic dress, freestyle movements, and intense music, accompanied by vocals and flutes from the Northern Plains to complete the performance. Throughout Native American history, dancing has always represented a major tenant of the culture, and such an opportunity to view traditional dance forms allows for a more complete understanding of Native American customs and heritage.

The Red Blanket Native Pride Dancers’ mission is to “educate, inspire, motivate, and empower diverse communities to bridge cultural gaps through indigenous traditions.” Like many other native groups, they are “passionately devoted to keeping traditions alive” through music and dance.

DATE: Thursday, November 9, 2017

TIME: The doors open at 6:30 PM, and the event begins at 7:00 PM. The event concludes around 8:30 PM.

PLACE: USAHEC, Visitor and Education Center, Multipurpose Room

For updates and any last-minute changes, please check the USAHEC website: www.USAHEC.org or call the Information Desk: (717) 245-3972.

Hits: 139
0

At 11:00 am on November 11th, 1918, the First World War, one of the most devastating and tragic conflicts the world has ever seen, came to a conclusion. Early on that November morning, senior military and political officials of both the Allied and German armies met in the Compiègne Forest of northern France to finalize and sign the armistice that would bring peace to war torn Europe. Since that time, countries across the world have chosen November 11th to honor those Soldiers who died in the “war to end all wars.” In the case of the United States, we have grown the purpose to honor all of those who serve in the Armed Forces, past and present, by renaming it Veterans Day.

In recognition of the World War I Centennial, and to honor all those who have served and are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces, the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) will be hosting a living history event entitled “Remembering Armistice Day” on Veterans Day weekend, November 11th and 12th, 2017. The event will commence at 10:00am and run until 3:00pm and will be located at the World War I Allied and German trenches on USAHEC’s Army Heritage Trail. Among the day’s highlights include reenactors who will be illustrating the events as they unfolded for the 316th Infantry Regiment, AEF in the hours leading up to and the day following the Compiègne Armistice. Visitors are invited to come witness the life of an American Doughboy in the trenches and the end of the war for the 316th. The event will follow the unit’s daily wartime routine – patrolling, caring for those in the Aid Station, cooking for the troops, and maintaining the supply line to the front – and will then recognize the end of the war at 11:00 am on Saturday. Visitors are welcome to attend at any time during event hours.

Following the end of World War I, November 11th became a national day of mourning and remembrance in many of the nations whose Soldiers had served in the war, including the United States; however, in 1954 President Dwight D. Eisenhower officially changed the holiday to Veterans Day “in order that a grateful nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation.” A day of honor and remembrance, November 11th continues to be an important reminder of the sacrifices made by our Veterans.

The day’s events are open to the public and free to attend. As always, USAHEC exhibits, including the Soldier Experience Gallery and the new World War I exhibit, “‘Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France’ – America in the Era of World War,” both located in the Visitor and Education Center, are open from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. For directions to USAHEC, general information, or question about the event, please visit: www.USAHEC.org or call: 717-245-3972.

Hits: 151
0

Perspectives in Military History

 

General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley Memorial Lecture

 

The Custer Conundrum

Exploring Leadership and the Contradictory Life of George Armstrong Custer 

T.J. Stiles

Pulitzer Prize Winner for Autobiography and History

 

George Armstrong Custer proved himself a highly capable commander from the battlefields of the American Civil War, through the hills of Texas, to his final moments on the Great Plains. On Wednesday, October 18, 2017, the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) will host Mr. T.J. Stiles, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize, as he presents a lecture entitled, “The Custer Conundrum.” The lecture will examine the complicated nature of leadership principals in the U.S. Army through the lens of the peculiar combination of Custer's skills as a combat leader and failings as a regimental field commander. 

Brevet Major General of U.S. Volunteers during the Civil War and later, a Lieutenant Colonel in the 7th U.S. Cavalry Regiment, George A. Custer was a highly skilled tactician and inspiring figure in battle, but failed to manage his men well in non-kinetic settings, whether in Texas in 1865–66 or on the Great Plains over the next decade. He also developed a problematic reputation within the Army that complicated his relationship with his superiors, who often assumed the worst about him. Custer’s career sheds light on the U.S. Army itself, and its role in the transitional time during the push west across the continent in the Post-Civil War years. The Army represented the leading edge of modernization in the United States, introducing finely articulated organization, professionalization, and technical expertise into an individualistic country that was transforming into a corporate, organizational economy and society. Custer was both a highly trained professional—a technical expert—and a romantic individualist; his volatile nature emphasizes the broader themes of this transition. His self-destructive tendencies lead to a story, which highlights the peculiar demands the Army faced in conflict with Native peoples on the Great Plains.

Mr. Stiles is an award-winning author and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2010 and for history in 2016. He graduated from Carleton College with distinction in history and received his Master of Arts and Master of Philosophy degrees from Columbia University. He worked alongside top American historians at Oxford University Press, before starting his extensive writing career publishing, Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War, The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America.

 

DATE: October 18, 2017

TIME: Doors open at 6:30 PM and the talk begins at 7:15 PM

PLACE: USAHEC, Visitor and Education Center, Multipurpose Rooms

 

For updates and any last minute changes in meeting times/places, please check the USAHEC website: www.USAHEC.org or call the Information Desk: 717-245-3972.

Hits: 256
0

On October 3 beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the Army Heritage Center Foundation, in conjunction with the U.S. Army War College Memorial Chapel and Stephen Ministry, will present a renowned panel of veterans who will share their war experiences and lessons learned from the Burns and Novick series, The Vietnam War.  The program will provide an opportunity for the audience to share and reflect on their own experience and help facilitate continued dialogue concerning the impact of war on their lives.

After the panel and discussions, COL (Retired) Neal Delasanti, Director, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Cumberland County, PA, will be available for brief consultations.

The distinguished panel will include:

COL (Retired) Dr. Don Snider – Served three combat tours as an infantry officer in Vietnam, decorated for both valor and wounds. He is a distinguished faculty member of the U.S. Army War College and Professor Emeritus from the United States Military Academy. He has authored numerous publications on leadership, ethics, and the moral development of leaders. Dr. Snider retired in October 2016 after 53 years of service within the Department of Defense and continues today in adjunct status.

COL (Retired) Tony Nadal – Served two tours in Vietnam. He was engaged in heavy infantry combat in the Ia Drang Valley, the Bong Son plain, and in Kontum Province. He served as Commanding Officer of A Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry during the battle of the la Drang Valley. Harold Moore and Joseph Galloway documented the Battle of the la Drang Valley in their book We Were Soldiers Once … And Young. Prior to retirement from the military, COL Nadal served on the faculty of the U.S. Army War College.

COL David Benedek – Professor of Psychiatry and Chairman of the Uniformed Services University's Department of Psychiatry. He is also an Associate Director of the University's Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress.  He has authored or co-authored over 75 scientific publications and has presented on numerous aspects of military, disaster, and forensic psychiatry at regional, national, and international professional conferences. In addition to his operational experience in Bosnia and Croatia, Dr. Benedek has deployed to Cuba, Iraq, and Kuwait in conjunction with the Global War on Terrorism. He is co-editor of the recently published Clinical Manual for Management of PTSD.

LTC (Retired) Dr. Douglas Johnson – Served two combat tours in Vietnam as an artillery officer. He was with the Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College from 1985 until 2009. His 30 years of service in the U.S. Army included two combat tours, a variety of troop and staff assignments, and instructor duty at the U.S. Military Academy and the School of Advanced Military Studies at Fort Leavenworth. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and holds a diploma from the U.S. Army War College.

The evening’s discussion will be moderated by Chaplain (COL) Jerry Sieg, Carlisle Barracks’ Installation Chaplain.

The evening is meant to be interactive. Reflections and comments by the audience will be encouraged. Members of the panel feel that it is important for combat veterans to “tell their story”. This can provide continued understanding of their war experiences as part of a healing process.

 

 

Hits: 420
0

Posted by on in News and Events

Millions of Americans answered the call of duty when the United States entered World War I and nineteen year-old Howard Munder of Philadelphia was among them.  Enlisting just ten days after the declaration of war, Munder soon found himself on his way to Camp Hancock, Georgia, to join the newly formed 28th Infantry Division.  When the division deployed to France as part of the American Expeditionary Forces, Bugler Munder went with them.

Munder was a prolific letter writer and typically sent home several letters a week.  His collected and transcribed letters now reside in the archival collections at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, PA.

Starting on September 15, the Army Heritage Center Foundation began publishing Munder’s letters online on the 100th anniversary of the day each letter was written.  This mode of publication was conceived by the Foundation’s Education Director, Jeff Hawks.

“When you pick up a published collection of letters,” Hawks says, “you have the entire story right there, all at once.  That’s not how the families experienced the story.  100 years ago, families did not know when the next letter from their loved ones would arrive.  They had to wait, sometimes patiently, sometimes anxiously, checking the mail every day, not knowing when the next letter would come.  The technology of online publishing gives us the opportunity to re-create, in some respect, that experience.  Our hope is that our readers will start to follow Munder as his story unfolds in real-time, albeit 100 years after the fact.”

Hawks refuses to answer questions about Munder’s ultimate fate.  “His parents didn’t know what was going to happen.  Anyone who wants to know is going to have to read along and find out in the same timeframe they did.”

During World War I, about two million Americans shipped out for France.  53,402 died or went missing in combat, 63,306 died from other causes, and 204,002 were wounded or injured, a casualty rate of about 16%.  Hawks notes that these casualties include 3 Army Nurses wounded by shellfire and 272 Army Nurses who died of various diseases that were rampant in the war zone.

 

To read the letters as they are published, visit the Army Heritage Center Foundation’s website at https://www.armyheritage.org/2-site-content/578-howard-munder-over-there-with-the-28th-infantry-division.

 

Hits: 281
0

Holocaust survivor Edith Vidos and Army Nurse Deborah Pecora will share their experiences as witnesses to the Holocaust at 12:30 PM on Friday, September 22, 2017, at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC).  Edith, a young Jewish girl living in Hungary, survived years of brutal imprisonment at Ravensbruck and Penig concentration camps.  Deborah, an Army Nurse, participated in the liberation of the Penig and provided medical care to the survivors including Edith Vidos. 

Their presentations are part of a day-long program conducted by facilitators from Echoes and Reflections, a partnership between Yad Vashem, the Shoah Foundation, and the Anti-Defamation League to train teachers how to incorporate Holocaust education in the classroom.  The full program runs from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM.  The Army Heritage Center Foundation, the non-profit friends group for USAHEC, is sponsoring the program as an element of its educational mission.

“The Holocaust is part of the Army story,” says the program organizer and the Army Heritage Center Foundation’s Education Director Jeff Hawks.  “American Soldiers were eyewitnesses to the reality of the camps.  They wrote about what they saw in letters, diaries, and memoirs that are part of the USAHEC collection.  The value of this record grows in importance every day as more and more eyewitnesses pass into history.”

The sessions will focus on the book Night, by Elie Wiesel.  Specific topics will include placing the work in the larger historical context and examining some of the major themes of the memoir.  Ms. Vidos and Ms. Pecora will begin their presentations starting at 3:30 PM.

Members of the public are welcome to attend the day’s program.  Certified teachers who attend will receive Act 48 credit.

For more information, or to RSVP, contact the Jeff Hawks at the Army Heritage Center Foundation at 717-258-1102 or eddirector@armyheritage.org.

 

About the Army Heritage Center Foundation

 

The Military Heritage Foundation, doing business as the Army Heritage Center Foundation, is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that, through donated support, is funding the construction of the public components of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) — the Visitor and Education Center (VEC) and the Army Heritage Center.  As the phased construction program is completed, the Foundation transfers these facilities to the Army to operate, staff, and maintain, as part of USAHEC. The Foundation will then focus on “margin of excellence support” to meet the needs of educational programs and other activities at USAHEC where federal funds are inadequate or unavailable. 

 

The Foundation completed Phase One of the Visitor and Education Center in 2010.   This project provided the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center campus its first major gallery and multipurpose rooms to host educational programs and special events. In 2013, the Foundation funded infrastructure improvements to include parking and storm water management systems to support future construction.  The Foundation completed a 7,500 expansion of the Visitor and Education Center in September 2016. Known as the Hall of the American Soldier, this expansion added an additional gallery, a multipurpose room to meet growing demand for program space, and enhanced seating for the cafe.

 

The Foundation will continue to seek grants and donations to complete the Visitor and Education Center, the Army Heritage Center, and to create an endowment to sustain and enhance educational programs. The Foundation’s education program includes management of the National History Day in Pennsylvania competition and workshops and seminars that complement USAHEC’s programs and exhibits. 

 

The Foundation also supports and enhances USAHEC’s public outreach by supporting marketing initiatives and serving as a public advocate of the Center’s mission and programs. 

Hits: 412
0

Over two-hundred middle-school students will team up with local Veterans while touring the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) in Carlisle on Thursday, September 14 for a “Walk With a Veteran” program.  The students will spend the day at the Center with the Veterans exploring the mile-long Army Heritage Trail, learning about the history of our nation and the men and women who served in the military in times of war and adversity.

“There’s no better way to learn about history than from the people who lived through it,” says Army Heritage Center Foundation Education Director Jeff Hawks. “The exhibits at USAHEC provide the perfect backdrop for Veterans to share their stories of service and sacrifice.”

The Army Heritage Center Foundation is hosting the program with the tremendous support of our sponsors.  Humana is the premier sponsor for the event.  “Humana approached us about doing something for Veterans and local youths,” Hawks says.  “This event grew out of that conversation.”  Ahold is also sponsoring the event, providing lunch for the students and Veterans.

The event will also mark National POW/MIA Day and will feature Mr. Don McClarren who served on the USS Pueblo when the ship was boarded and seized by North Korean forces in January of 1968.  Along with 82 crewmates, he endured months of brutal captivity as a POW while North Korea attempted to extract confessions from the crew and political concessions from the United States. McClarren and his shipmates were freed after 11 months, but the USS Pueblo remains in North Korean hands.  McClarren’s story is a reminder that no matter where or when one serves, military service carries considerable risk.

For more information about this program, please contact the Army Heritage Center Foundation at 717-258-1102 or info@armyheritage.org

Hits: 337
0

Please Note: Reservations are no longer being accepted for the September 12 screening as attendance has reached maximum capacity.

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center invites you to a very special event, a two-night screening of two important documentaries about the Vietnam War on September 12 and 13, 2017. First, on September 12th, WITF and the Army Heritage Center Foundation will show a special one hour preview of “THE VIETNAM WAR--a landmark documentary film series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.” On September 13th, WPSU will take part in the national dialogue sparked by Ken Burns’ film with their documentary “A Time to Heal: Exploring the Vietnam War Experience from a Pennsylvania Perspective.” Each night, the program will begin at 6:15 PM and Cumberland Café will offer a special dinner menu to enjoy before the film screening events.

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick's ten-part, 18-hour documentary series “THE VIETNAM WAR,” tells the epic story of one of the most consequential, divisive, and controversial events in American history as it has never before been told on film. Visceral and immersive, the series explores the human dimensions of the war through revelatory testimony of nearly 80 witnesses from all sides--Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam. The exclusive sneak preview highlights service-people, the Vietnamese perspective, media and journalism, leadership, civilian life, the anti-war movement, Veterans coming home, and more. After the screening, audience members can share their stories and take part in a panel discussion with local experts.

On the second night, "A Time to Heal" is a 60-minute documentary from WPSU Penn State, which explores the impact of the Vietnam War on the lives of those who fought, protested, or prayed for their loved ones to come home alive.  Producer Lindsey Whissel Fenton travels across Pennsylvania, talking with men and women about their experiences during the war and their perspectives now, seeking an answer to the question: is it finally a time to heal?  The film also features footage from the USAHEC Collection. The documentary will have a panel of local Veterans impacted by the war as well as the producer/writer of the documentary. 

Doors open at 5:00 PM and both programs begin at 6:15 PM. Cumberland Café will have a special dinner menu to enjoy before the program. Admission is free for both events, and we strongly encourage patrons to attend both nights.  For directions or more information about the documentaries, please visit www.usahec.org.

Hits: 384
0

The Board of Directors of the Army Heritage Center Foundation is pleased to announce the honorees that the Foundation will recognize at its 10th Annual Membership and Recognition Dinner at the U. S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) on November 4, 2017.

 

Awardees

  • Living Legend Award: Mr Bill Beck
  • Boots on the Ground Award: Mr. Joseph Galloway
  • MG John Armstrong Award: R.S. Mowery & Sons

 

Background

Bill Beck will receive the Foundation’s Living Legend Award for his contributions as a Soldier during the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley during the Vietnam War.  His individual achievements deserve recognition and serve as an inspiration for others. Beck was drafted into the Army in 1964 and during the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley in November 1965, much like Joshua Chamberlain did for the Union Army at Gettysburg, he secured the flank of his unit’s position.  He was awarded a Silver Star for these actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner in the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (1/7 Cav), 1st Cavalry Division.  Then and now, he represents those Soldiers who joined the Army and fought in the initial battles of the Vietnam War.

Recognizing individuals or organizations that make a very positive contribution to the lives of Soldiers and their families, the Foundation has selected Joe Galloway to receive the Foundation’s Boots on the Ground AwardGalloway has not allowed our Soldiers to be forgotten.  His service as a military reporter, columnist, and author has helped publicize and humanize our Soldiers, especially related to the Battle of the Ia Drang Valley in Vietnam. Joe Galloway was a 23 year old United Press International reporter who was assigned to Vietnam in 1965.  He wanted to tell the stories of Soldiers in war, and to do so, he had to serve with them in the field.  In November 1965, he accompanied the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment into the Ia Drang Valley.  To save his and Soldiers’ lives he had to take up arms.  He received a Bronze Star with V Device for his actions and forged a deep friendship with Soldiers of the unit.  He would later tell their stories in the best-selling book, We Were Soldiers Once and Young.

Don Mowery of R.S. Mowery & Sons will receive the MG John Armstrong Award.  Named for MG John Armstrong (1725-1795), a Soldier, a Statesman, a Pioneer, and a Leader who shaped the development of this region and the Nation, the award recognizes individuals and organizations that have helped develop USAHEC. For the past decade, Don Mowery has been an ardent supporter of the Foundation’s efforts and has been instrumental in enhancing the public components of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center campus particularly through the design and construction of the Visitor and Education Center and the Hall of the American Soldier.

 

The Dinner

This annual dinner will be held at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, allowing the Foundation to better showcase the Center’s assets to its guests, to honor Veterans past and present and those who support Soldiers, and to thank those who support the Army Heritage Center Foundation and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in “Telling the Army Story . . . one Soldier at a time.®”   

Included in the evening’s activities is a silent auction that includes unique items and gift certificates to regional attractions, restaurants, wineries, and golf courses, among others.

Dinner sponsorship opportunities are available. For additional details about the dinner and silent auction, or to order tickets, please contact the Foundation at (717) 258-1102, info@armyheritage.org, or visit www.armyheritage.org.

 

About the Foundation and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

The Military Heritage Foundation, doing business as the Army Heritage Center Foundation, is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that, through donated support, is funding the construction of the public components of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) — the Visitor and Education Center (VEC) and the Army Heritage Center.  As the phased construction program is completed, the Foundation transfers these facilities to the Army to operate, staff, and maintain, as part of USAHEC. The Foundation will then focus on “margin of excellence support” to meet the needs of educational programs and other activities at USAHEC where federal funds are inadequate or unavailable.  

The Foundation completed Phase One of the Visitor and Education Center in 2010.   This project provided the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center campus its first major gallery and multipurpose rooms to host educational programs and special events. In 2013, the Foundation funded infrastructure improvements to include parking and storm water management systems to support future construction.  The Foundation completed a 7,500 expansion of the Visitor and Education Center in September 2016 that added an additional gallery, a multipurpose room to meet growing demand for program space, and enhanced seating for the cafe.

The Foundation will continue to seek grants and donations to complete the Visitor and Education Center, the Army Heritage Center, and to create an endowment to sustain and enhance educational programs. The Foundation’s education program includes management of the National History Day in Pennsylvania competition and workshops and seminars that complement USAHEC’s programs and exhibits. 

The Foundation also supports and enhances USAHEC’s public outreach by supporting marketing initiatives and serving as a public advocate of the Center’s mission and programs. 

USAHEC is dedicated to honoring the men and women who have served this nation as Soldiers and preserving their legacy through the acquisition of their letters, diaries, photos, and artifacts that document their service.  USAHEC also educates a broad audience on the heritage of the Army by making its collections available to the public in the Ridgway Hall research room, through exhibits on the USAHEC campus, and through special programs.   A Smithsonian Affiliate, USAHEC is a component of the U.S. Army War College.  Since 2004 when the facility opened to the public, almost 1.4 million have visited.  Learn more about USAHEC at https://ahec.armywarcollege.edu.

Hits: 526
0

 Nine Pennsylvania students received honors at the 2017 National History Day (NHD) Contest at the University of Maryland at College Park. They were among the 62 PA students vying for top honors at the international competition, which brought together 3,040 competing students from 57 states, U.S. territories, and foreign nations.

 

Although Pennsylvania’s 62 students represented only 2% of the students competing, they brought home 5.5% of the medals awarded for entries that finished in the top three, a level of achievement that is a testament to the strength of the NHD in PA program and the Commonwealth’s educational system.

 

The Pennsylvania students who received awards are:

 

National Champion and National Endowment for the Humanities Scholar - Senior Individual Website

Title: Beyond the Cardigan

Student: Joanna Harlacher

Teacher: Elizabeth Lewis, Donegal High School, Mount Joy

 

Second Place – Junior Individual Exhibit

Title: Mary Beth Tinker: The Voice Behind Student Free Speech

Student: Brendan Hung

Teacher: Joseph Echternach, Radnor Middle School, Bryn Mawr

 

Third Place - Senior Group Exhibit

Title: "A Force of Nature": Wangari Maathai Fights for the Environment and the People

Students: Sara Skwaryk, Rebecca Wahlenmayer, and Elizabeth Wahlenmayer

Teacher: Randy Styborski, Girard High School, Girard

 

The George Washington Leadership in History Award

Category: Junior Individual Performance

Title: Taking a Stand in the Shadows: The Culper Spy Ring During the Revolutionary War

Student: Lilianna Hug

Teacher: Annelise Carleton-Hug, Salamander Meadows Homeschool, Ohiopyle

 

Outstanding Entry from Pennsylvania - Junior Group Website

Title:  Quietly Taking a Stand in Every Neighborhood: How Mr. Rogers Changed Children’s Television and Influenced Generations

Students: Isabelle Meyers and Henry Meyers

Teacher: Josh Elders, Peters Township Middle School, McMurray

 

Outstanding Entry from Pennsylvania - Senior Individual Performance

Title:  Rosa Parks: Taking a Stand by Sitting Down

Student: Sydney Altemose

Teacher: Eric Mark, Bishop McDevitt High School, Harrisburg

 

National History Day is a year-long academic program proven to enhance student achievement and college and career readiness. In 2012, the internationally recognized program, based in College Park, Maryland, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama and the National Endowment for the Humanities. In Pennsylvania, National History Day is sponsored by the Army Heritage Center Foundation in Carlisle.

 

The theme for 2017 was Taking a Stand in History. Students spent the past year researching and analyzing historical sources, drawing conclusions, and developing projects to demonstrate what they have learned about topics of their own choosing. The projects fall into one of five categories: video documentaries, exhibits, historical papers, dramatic performances, and website.  Approximately 12,000 Pennsylvania students participate in the program each year. Students enter their projects in a series of local, regional, and state contests to qualify for the national contest. 

 

The following Pennsylvania students were among the finalists who finished in the top ten in their category:

 

Fifth Place - Junior Individual Performance

Title:  Taking a Stand in the Shadows: The Culper Spy Ring During the Revolutionary War

Student: Lilianna Hug

Teacher: Annelise Carleton-Hug, Salamander Meadows Homeschool, Ohiopyle

 

Fifth Place - Junior Group Website

Title: Quietly Taking a Stand in Every Neighborhood: How Mr. Rogers Changed Children’s Television and Influenced Generations

Students: Isabelle Meyers and Henry Meyers

Teacher: Josh Elders, Peters Township Middle School, McMurray

 

Sixth Place - Junior Individual Website

Title: Hernando de Soto Polar: An Economic Answer to Terrorism

Student: Margaret Atkins

Teacher: Helena Ryder, Academy Of Notre Dame De Namur, Villanova

 

Seventh Place - Senior Individual Performance

Rosa Parks: Taking a Stand by Sitting Down

Student: Sydney Altemose

Teacher: Eric Mark, Bishop McDevitt High School, Harrisburg

 

Tenth Place - Senior Paper

Title: "God Rewards Fools"- Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman's Stand to Revolutionize Cryptography

Student: Chloe Makdad

Teacher: Jessica Hetrick, Tyrone Area High School, Tyrone

 

To learn more about the NHD in PA program, including how to participate, please contact State Coordinator Jeff Hawks at eddirector@armyheritage.org or 717-258-1102.

Hits: 388
0

U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle

June 30, 2017   7:30 PM – Free and Open to the Public

 

The Army Heritage Center Foundation presents a live broadcast of the Daily Caller’s Facebook show No Things Considered with Tim Young on June 30 beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, PA. The public is encouraged to attend as part of the live onsite audience.

A political comedian from Baltimore and best-selling author, Tim Young is the host of what is considered the right-leaning version of the Daily Show. With over 1.7 million viewers each week, No Things Considered airs live every weeknight at 7:30 p.m. on the Daily Caller’s Facebook Page. Young has also appeared in comedy clubs around the country and on Fox News Channel’s Red Eye, CNN, and in the Huffington Post.  

On his visit to USAHEC, he will highlight the uniqueness of the complex’s combination of archives, library, outdoor heritage trail, and museum exhibits.

 

About the Foundation and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center 

The Military Heritage Foundation, doing business as the Army Heritage Center Foundation, is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that, through donated support, is funding the construction of the public components of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) — the Visitor and Education Center (VEC), the Hall of the American Soldier,  and the Army Heritage Center.  As the phased construction program is completed, the Foundation transfers these facilities to the Army to operate, staff, and maintain, as part of USAHEC. The Foundation will then focus on “margin of excellence support” to meet the needs of educational programs and other activities at USAHEC where federal funds are inadequate or unavailable. 

The Foundation completed Phase One of the Visitor and Education Center in 2010 with the Center’s first dedicated gallery and multipurpose rooms, infrastructure improvements to include parking and storm water management systems to support future construction in 2013, and the Hall of the American Soldier expansion in 2016 that provides additional gallery and meeting spaces.  

The Foundation is continuing to seek grants and donations to complete the Visitor and Education Center and the Army Heritage Center and to create an endowment to sustain and enhance educational programs. The Foundation’s education program includes management of the National History Day in Pennsylvania competition, a Veterans’ Café, and workshops and seminars that complement USAHEC’s programs and exhibits. 

The Foundation also supports and enhances USAHEC’s public outreach by supporting marketing initiatives and serving as a public advocate of the Center’s mission and programs. Learn more about the Foundation at www.armyheritage.org.

USAHEC is dedicated to honoring the men and women who have served this nation as Soldiers and preserving their legacy through the acquisition of their letters, diaries, photos, and artifacts that document their service.  USAHEC also educates a broad audience on the heritage of the Army by making its collections available to the public in the Ridgway Hall research room, through exhibits on the USAHEC campus, and through special programs.   A Smithsonian Affiliate, USAHEC is a component of the U.S. Army War College.  Since 2004, when the facility opened to the public, more than 1.3 million have visited.  Learn more about USAHEC at www.usahec.org.

Hits: 645
0

Cumberland Pathways Family History and Genealogy Conference 
October 20-22, 2017

 

For centuries, Pennsylvania’s Cumberland Valley was a pathway toward this dream.
You will find your family story at the 
Cumberland Pathways conference in Carlisle, PA.

The Cumberland County Historical Society (CCHS), the Army Heritage Center Foundation, the Cumberland Valley Visitors Bureau, Dickinson College, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania offer you the opportunity to explore your family history at Cumberland Pathways, October 20-22, 2017 in beautiful and historic Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  These institutions are home to unique archives and special collections.  During Cumberland Pathways, experts will provide guidance for your own family research and present the latest in genealogy trends.  Conference topics will range from preserving what you know to using DNA to unlock your family’s mysteries.

Millions of Americans trace their family story to the Cumberland Valley. They left clues to their life experiences.  You can find them in the Cumberland Valley’s rich genealogical treasures.  More than 250 years of social, cultural, political and military history are protected and preserved here. Our archives house documents that you will find nowhere else.  CCHS, USAHEC, and Dickinson College have led the way in the digitization of family records and the creation of oral history archives.  Your family’s story will come alive during Cumberland Pathways and you will leave inspired by our expert speakers and workshops.

 

Register Now

Tagged in: genealogy
Hits: 663
0

The historic town of Bayeux, France, will be the base for an Army Heritage Center Foundation tour of sites related to D-Day and the Normandy Campaign in France.  From Sept 24 – 29th, 2017, a small group will be guided by historian  Dr. Brooke Blades, whose research programs have led him to iconic sites to be visited including the Normandy American Cemetery, Omaha Beach, Utah Beach, and airborne landing areas near Ste. Mère-Eglise and Carentan.  The British and Canadian landing beaches and cemeteries, as well as interior sites such as the culminating battlefields between Falaise and Chamboise will be toured.  For the history enthusiast interested in in-depth information, including period photos, documents, maps, and reminiscences of battlefield commanders, this tour will be a rewarding experience. 

Accommodations will be provided by a three-star hotel in Bayeux. Travel through the picturesque countryside will be by motor coach to maximize opportunities to discuss sites to be visited.  Sponsored by The Army Heritage Center Foundation in Carlisle, PA, this tour is, in part, a fundraiser for the Foundation.  For details of the tour and a travel brochure, please contact Brooke Blades of NW Europe Study Tours at aurigblades@gmail.com.

 

 

 

Hits: 989
0

In April of 1917, the United States officially entered World War I, a conflict once known as “the war to end all wars.” Unlike anything before it, World War I fundamentally changed the way in which war was fought and evolved the concept of diplomatic relations into what it is today.  One hundred years later, the effects of World War I are more apparent than ever. On Thursday, April 6, 2017 at 3:00 p.m., the United States Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) will unveil the final installment of its World War I commemorative exhibit, “Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France: America in the Era of World War I.” USAHEC’s exhibit opening will occur in conjunction with the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission’s ceremony, happening the same day, and honoring the legacy of World War I and the United States of America’s pivotal role. The Centennial Commission’s event will be held at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO.

The first section of the exhibit, currently on display in USAHEC’s Ridgway Hall, provides an overview of the war. The second section will highlight the numerous battles that occurred in World War I and the stories of the Soldiers who fought in them. Artifacts, photographs, and archival materials will help tell these stories and create an in-depth and engaging battlefield landscape. During the exhibit opening, World War I reenactors will be onsite to further immerse visitors into the lives of these Soldiers and to answer questions about this critical period of American history. The exhibit will also examine how the birth of new technologies, such as machine guns, tanks, poison gas, artillery, and aircraft, were integral in both influencing the outcome of the war and increasing the utter devastation it caused. 

The second phase of “Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France” will open at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 6, 2017, and is free and open to the public. After experiencing both parts of the exhibit, feel free to visit the many other exhibits featured at USAHEC, including “The Soldier Experience” and “Treasures of USAHEC.” Visitors can also grab lunch at Café Cumberland, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., or browse the book selection found at the Museum Store. Parking is free, and the USAHEC facility is handicapped accessible. For more information about “Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France” or any of the other exhibits, please visit our website: www.USAHEC.org. 

Hits: 936
0

Whether it’s a miniature of a favorite classic tank like the FT-17, or a model of a P-51 Mustang airplane, an aircraft carrier like the U.S.S. Nimitz, or even the Civil War-era submarine, the Hunley, models have long captured the interests of children and adults alike.  Paper modeling, in particular, provides almost anyone with an introduction and access to an exciting world of miniatures. An intricate and meticulous pastime, paper model building has become a popular art that includes almost any subject, especially military vehicles and crafts.  What better way to learn more about paper modeling and military history, than at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center’s (USAHEC), Military History through Paper Modeling Event on Saturday, April 1, 2017, from 10:30 AM – 4:00 PM.  Come out to USAHEC in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to learn more about the amazingly detailed craft of military paper modeling, and maybe even create some of your own!

The Military History through Paper Modeling Event will feature lectures on the art of papercraft, dozens of paper modelers and displays of their art, and a hands-on “make and take” table for future paper modelers of all skill levels.  An introductory lecture and demonstration will kick off the event, and the rest of the day will be open to guests to visit the various paper modeling tables.  Military vehicles and crafts, such as Sherman Tanks, Huey helicopters, and M23 Tank Transporters or “Dragon Wagons” will be featured.  Be sure to check out all of these amazing replicas, which are created using only printed paper and prodigious skill.  Don’t forget to try your own hand at creating some of these masterpieces at the “make and take” table, where modelers of all genres will be handing out sample modeling patterns.

The last of USAHEC’s Winter History Program Series, this event is not one to miss!  After exploring the event, feel free to learn more about the lives and stories of Soldiers throughout U.S. history by visiting the many exhibits featured at USAHEC. You can also grab lunch at Café Cumberland from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., or browse the book selection found at the museum store. Parking is free, and the USAHEC facility is handicap accessible. For more information about the “Military History Through Paper Modeling,” event and other events, please visit our website at www.USAHEC.org. 

Hits: 897
0

The Army Heritage Center Foundation is hosting Echoes and Reflections, a professional development program focusing on the Holocaust for teachers, administrators, and college students majoring in Education on March 31, 2017 from 8:30 AM to 3:30 PM at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, PA.  Holocaust survivor Ernie Gross will be among those in attendance and will speak about his experience.

Ernie Gross was 15 when his family was sent to a concentration camp from their home in Hungary.  Within a few weeks of being ordered to leave, Ernie found himself passing through the gates of Auschwitz.  He did not know it yet, but there, in the selection process, he was minutes away from death.  But, a Jewish guard saved his life by telling him to lie and say he was 17 so he would be selected for work instead of the gas chambers.

Ernie was sent to Dachau, where he was used for slave labor.  But as the war ground to an end, the Germans decided to exterminate all the remaining Jews that they could.  Once again, Ernie was less than an hour from death when German soldiers began throwing down their weapons.  The U.S. Army had arrived.  Ernie Gross and the remaining 30,000 inmates at Dachau were liberated.

Ernie immigrated to the United States in 1947.  Sixty years after being liberated, Ernie met and became friends with veterans of the units that liberated the camp.  Ernie will attend the workshop on March 31 to talk about his experience and answer questions from the participants.

Foundation Education Director Jeff Hawks explains why an organization dedicated to the history of the Army is interested in Holocaust Education:  “The U.S. Army played a significant role in the liberations of concentration camps in Europe, “says Hawks.  “American Soldiers were witness to the Holocaust, and many of their accounts can be found in the collections here at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.  Army history isn’t just about how and when our nation goes to war, but why.”

The Echoes and Reflections program provides materials and training to implement Holocaust education in schools and is a joint venture between the Anti-Defamation League, USC Shoah Foundation, and Yad Vashem.  Attending teachers will receive free classroom materials and Act 48 professional development credits.

Pennsylvania Act 70 of 2014 “strongly encourages school entities in this Commonwealth to offer instruction in the Holocaust, genocide and other human rights violations” in order to “provide children with an understanding of the importance of the protection of human rights and the potential consequences of unchecked ignorance, discrimination and persecution...”

The program is open to teachers, administrators, and students majoring in Education.  Contact the Army Heritage Center Foundation for information on how to register at 717-258-1102 or info@armyheritage.org.

 

Hits: 836
0

Born in New Oxford, MA on Christmas Day 1821, Clara Barton was a bright, sensitive girl fascinated by her father’s stories of his military experiences with “Mad” Anthony Wayne on the Pennsylvania/Ohio frontier.  Later, when Fort Sumter was attacked and President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to defend the Union in the Civil War, Clara headed for the front lines, taking supplies and nursing wounded soldiers, earning the title “Angel of the Battlefield.” After the war, she helped to locate thousands of missing soldiers for their families and shared her war experiences in lecture halls across the country.  She supported the Geneva Treaty which established the standards of international law for humanitarian treatment in war.  After her service during the Civil War, Clara founded the American Red Cross, saving thousands of lives in disaster relief here and abroad.

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center is pleased to announce a Women’s History Month commemoration event, featuring historian and actress Pat Jordan, as she presents a living history portrayal of Clara Barton. The free event begins at 1:00 pm on Monday, March 20, 2017 and is open to the public. Ms. Jordan is a professional actor, playwright, and director, whose passion for history led her to bring the stories of famous American women to appreciative audiences throughout the country. She has performed at venues, including the 42nd Street and Clurman Theatres in New York, Philadelphia’s Academy of Music, and in historical films such as Eyewitness to History, and History of the American Flag. She is a graduate of Villanova University and has studied at the HB Studio in NY and accredited venues such as Juilliard’s Opera Workshop with Vincent LaSelva, and Rutgers-Camden Summer Theatre Production Program.

Come celebrate Women’s History Month at USAHEC to learn more about the life and impact of Clara Barton! As always, USAHEC’s exhibits, to include the “Treasures of USAHEC,” “Goodbye Broadway, Hello France,” and the Soldier Experience Gallery, will be open. Stop by before the event for lunch at Café Cumberland which is open 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and feel free to browse the Museum Store. Parking is free and the USAHEC facility is handicapped accessible. For more information about this and all other events, please call: 717-245-3972 or visit the website: www.USAHEC.org.

Hits: 996
0

Perspectives in Military History Roundtable

49th Annual Lecture Series

Cassandra in Oz: Counterinsurgency and Future War

Dr. Conrad Crane

Chief, USAHEC Historical Services Division

In the years following the tragedy of September 11, 2001, the United States military grasped at the best way to engage in two wars, while remaining the world’s super power. Dr. Conrad Crane, only recently retired from active duty service in the U.S. Army, found himself a modern Cassandra, warning the military leadership about the preparation requirements for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps to conduct stability operations and counterinsurgency in Iraq. Dr. Crane’s continued push for proper planning in the eventual reconstruction of Iraq attracted the scrutiny of then-commanders General David H. Petraeus, U.S. Army (Retired) and General James Mattis, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired). On Saturday, March 18, 2017 at 2:00 PM, Dr. Crane and GEN Petreaus will discuss the development of the formal response to the unpreparedness of American Forces: Field Manual 3-24/Marine Corps Warfighting Publication 3-33.5 Counterinsurgency. The presentations will be complimented by questions and discussion from panelists Dr. Richard Lacquement, Colonel John Martin, U.S. Army (Retired), and Colonel Robert Balcavage, all of whom either served under GEN Petreaus and were implementers, or worked with Dr. Crane in development of the Counterinsurgency (COIN) manual. They will discuss the implementation of the COIN doctrine, details about what went right and wrong in Iraq, and the lessons learned from over a decade of war.

Dr. Conrad Crane is the Chief, Historical Services Division, at the USAHEC, following ten years as the Director of the U.S. Army Military History Institute. Dr. Crane previously served with the U.S. Army War College’s (USAWC) Strategic Studies Institute after a 26 year career as an officer in the U.S. Army, including ten years as a Professor of History at the United States Military Academy. GEN David Petraeus is a Partner at KKR, and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute. He is the former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and served as the Commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan in 2010 and 2011. He also commanded the U.S. Central Command from 2008 to 2011, and served as the Commanding General for the Multi-National Force-Iraq from 2007 to 2008. Dr. Richard A. Lacquement, Jr. is the Dean of the School of Strategic Landpower at the USAWC. He served for more than 29 years in the U.S. Army, to include assignments with ISAF in Afghanistan, as Chief of Plans for U.S. Forces Korea, and in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy. COL John R. Martin served at the USAWC Strategic Studies Institute, after he retired from active service in the U.S. Army in 2004. He has extensive experience in the Republic of Korea and at the Pentagon on the Army Staff, and was deployed over his career to Kosovo and Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq. COL Robert Balcavage serves as the USAWC Chief of Staff. He commanded the 1/501st Infantry Regiment (ABN) during the surge in Iraq, and served combat tours in Operations Desert Storm/Desert Shield, Iraqi Freedom, and Enduring Freedom.

DATE: Saturday, March 18, 2017

TIME: The USAHEC opens to the public at 10:00 AM, and the roundtable discussion is from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM.

PLACE: USAHEC, Visitor and Education Center, Multi-Purpose Room

For more information on both events and any last-minute changes in meeting times and places, please check the USAHEC homepage: www.USAHEC.org or call the Information Desk: (717) 245-3972.

Hits: 941
0

Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield

 

Documentary Screening and Expert Panel Discussion

 

U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle

March 16, 2017   7:15 PM – Free and Open to the Public

 

In Coordination with the Dunham Army Health Clinic at Carlisle Barracks and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, the Army Heritage Center Foundation presents

Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, a one-hour documentary that tells the stories of the men and women who are at the forefront of the medical frontier winning victories for military personnel and civilians.  The documentary focuses on the doctors and surgeons treating survivors returning home to resume their lives and recover from sometimes critical injuries.

 

Following the documentary, a panel of individuals who represent organizations leading these medical victories will discuss aspects of the documentary. Panelists include:

  • LTG (R) Eric Schoomaker, 42nd Surgeon General of the United States Army and Professor and Vice-Chair for Leadersip, Centers & Programs, Department of Military & Emergency Medicine, USUHS, Bethesda, MD.
  • ·       COL (R) Paul Pasquina, Chief, Department of Rehabilitation, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Professor and Chair, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine - USUHS, Bethesda, MD; Documentary participant.
  • ·       Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio, Director of Rehabilitation for UPMC International and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • ·       Dr. Rory Cooper, Civilian Aid to the Secretary of the Army, Western PA and Director, Human Engineering Research Laboratories, University of Pittsburgh; Documentary participant.

 

More than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts between 2001 and 2014. But of the thousands of wounded who survive and were in combat hospitals, many returned to the United States severely wounded physically and emotionally. Military Medicine reveals the lifesaving measures implemented as a result of these wars – including faster medical evacuations, the creation of critical care air transport teams that converted military transport aircraft into flying intensive care units, and the increased use of tourniquets. Military doctors who have treated wounded troops abroad and at home explain how military medicine has changed over the past 15 years.

 

Using the best science and technology available, the physicians and scientists in military medicine work to improve the lives of America’s wounded as well as their families. The documentary takes viewers inside laboratories, hospitals, and rehabilitation centers, where military medical advances and technology are making artificial arms with life-like responses, 3-D printing new organs, adding robotic arms to wheelchairs, and giving damaged legs new strength. Woven throughout the documentary are the personal accounts from active duty troops, veterans, civilians, and military families who share how medical advances are both saving and changing their lives.

 

In terms of numbers, the biggest medical challenge for the military is treating service members with brain injuries who are dealing with memory loss and other symptoms of a traumatic brain injury. Specialized clinics are also helping service members identify and heal from these invisible wounds.

 

The program also delves beyond the medical aspects of medicine and demonstrates that there is still much to be done beyond the battlefield.

 

About the Foundation, the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center and Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic

 

The Military Heritage Foundation, doing business as the Army Heritage Center Foundation, is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that, through donated support, is funding the construction of the public components of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) — the Visitor and Education Center (VEC) and the Army Heritage Center.  As the phased construction program is completed, the Foundation transfers these facilities to the Army to operate, staff, and maintain, as part of USAHEC. The Foundation will then focus on “margin of excellence support” to meet the needs of educational programs and other activities at USAHEC where federal funds are inadequate or unavailable. 

 

The Foundation completed Phase One of the Visitor and Education Center in 2010 with the Center’s first dedicated gallery and multipurpose rooms, infrastructure improvements to include parking and storm water management systems to support future construction in 2013, and the Hall of the American Soldier expansion in 2016 that provides additional gallery and meeting spaces.  

 

The Foundation is continuing to seek grants and donations to complete the Visitor and Education Center and the Army Heritage Center and to create an endowment to sustain and enhance educational programs. The Foundation’s education program includes management of the National History Day in Pennsylvania competition and workshops and seminars that complement USAHEC’s programs and exhibits. 

 

The Foundation also supports and enhances USAHEC’s public outreach by supporting marketing initiatives and serving as a public advocate of the Center’s mission and programs. Learn more about the Foundation at www.armyheritage.org.

 

USAHEC is dedicated to honoring the men and women who have served this nation as Soldiers and preserving their legacy through the acquisition of their letters, diaries, photos, and artifacts that document their service.  USAHEC also educates a broad audience on the heritage of the Army by making its collections available to the public in the Ridgway Hall research room, through exhibits on the USAHEC campus, and through special programs.   A Smithsonian Affiliate, USAHEC is a component of the U.S. Army War College.  Since 2004, when the facility opened to the public, more than 1.2 million have visited.  Learn more about USAHEC at www.usahec.org.

 

The Dunham U.S. Army Health clinic at Carlisle Barracks - Serving to Heal...Honored to Serve - provides high quality healthcare and leadership to maximize medical readiness of the force and improve, restore, and sustain the health of its patients. The clinic provides primary care and selected specialty care for TRICARE Prime enrolled patients.

 

Hits: 1042
0